Home » Destinations » Italy » Turin, Italy: Cathedral of St. John the Baptist; Basilica of Maria Ausiliatrice; Sacre di San Michele, Basilica of Corpus Domini

Turin, Italy: Cathedral of St. John the Baptist; Basilica of Maria Ausiliatrice; Sacre di San Michele; Basilica of Corpus Domini

About the City of Turin:

Turin is perhaps best known among Catholics for being the location of the Holy Shroud.  As significant as the Shroud is, Turin offers a great deal more of interest to Catholics.  The fourth-largest city in the nation, Turin was the first capital of a united Italy, from 1861 to 1865, and is now the capital of the Piedmont region.  It is a great city to visit, and is often overlooked in favor of more well-known Italian cities such as Milan, Florence and Rome.  In the background you will see the Alps to the northwest, creating an interesting constrast. There are many baroque buildings and old cafes located in grand squares, which makes it a great tourist destination.

Among the major Catholic places of interest in Turin are:

Basilica of Maria Ausiliatrice (Our Lady Help of Christians) Three saints entombed here:  Saint John Bosco;  Saint Mary Mazzarello: Saint Dominic Savio

Basilica of Corpus Domini (Eucharistic Miracle of Turin)

Basilica di Superga (statue of Madonna delle Grazie)

Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist (Shroud of Turin and tomb of Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati)

Sacra di San Michele:  Ancient monastery, part of the Sword of Saint Michael…..just a few miles outside the city.

 

Traveling to Turin:

The city is easily reached by train from Milan (a bit over an hour) and also from Genoa (about two hours).  Get train & bus schedules, see fares & buy tickets here. In addition, Turin  has an international airport. The airport and train stations are shown on the map below.

Click here to find hotels & restaurants in Turin, compare prices, and read what other travelers have to say at TripAdvisor

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5 thoughts on “Turin, Italy: Cathedral of St. John the Baptist; Basilica of Maria Ausiliatrice; Sacre di San Michele, Basilica of Corpus Domini”

  1. My wife and I were among a tour group that were fortunate enough to see the shroud in person when it was displayed in the Cathedral a couple of years ago in Turin. The short presentation about the bloody wounds captured by the shroud was very revealing. I treasure the picture I took (not great without flash) and feel privileged to have seen it.

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